How to: Crochet a Perfect Circle

Today I want to introduce you to one of the very best hacks I’ve found and show you how you can do it. This is something I’ve learned making amigurumis, and is especially useful when making really big stuffed animals. And not only for amigurumis, but for making mandalas or anything that needs to become a circle in a solid colour; like coasters, cushions, or floor rugs. Trust me, you’ll be thankful for this one. You know how you increase and increase and your circle really becomes more of a hexagon (or pentagon, octagon or whatever)? Well, it’s is thanks to the placement of the increase stitches. If you follow the Inc, SC method (or SC, Inc), as the piece grows, the increases become corners when what you really want is a circle. This is what I mean: This should be a circle, but instead is a hexagon.  Fix it via missneriss.com #crochet #amigurumi You don’t really want this, right? I’m not a fan of the spoke look myself, and I found that when making amigurumis I had to really stuff the critter tight to work the corners out. This makes the poor little amigurumi really hard and not so cuddly, and my daughter wants cuddly! So, the method I have for you will make your circle come out just like this: Learn how to crochet a perfect circle instead of that annoying hexagon, on missneriss.com #crochet #amigurumi I think we can agree this looks much better, can’t we? Ready to learn how to do it? Basically, all you have to do is offset your increases. Really, it’s that simple. I’ll show you an example pattern that you can apply next time you’re crocheting a circle, or increasing in the round. R1: 6SC stitches into a Magic Ring R2: SC Increase around =12 stitches R3: (Increase, 1SC) x 6 = 18 stitches R4: 1SC, (increase, 2SC) x 5, Increase, SC = 24 stitches R5: (Increase, 3SC) x 6 = 30 stitches R6: 3SC, (increase, 4SC) x 5, 1SC = 36 stitches R7: (Increase, 5SC) x 6 = 42 stitches R8: 4SC, (increase, 6SC) x 5, 2SC = 48 stitches R9: (Increase, 7SC) x 6 = 54 stitches R10: 5SC, (increase, 8SC) x 5, 3SC = 60 stitches And just keep on going until you reach the amount of increases you need. When it comes to decrease rows, do the same thing, but in reverse. Look at the difference: 20140627-145541-53741247.jpg What do you think? Going to give it a try on your next project?

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38 responses to “How to: Crochet a Perfect Circle

  1. Oh wow this is great! 🙂 Thanks!

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  2. Thanks! I have to give this a try. Can you help me with something else. If I make a granny square blanket I have two issues. 1. If I make one big square I don’t know what happens but they always start to twist. Do you know what I mean? 2. If I make a blanket out of little squares I end up with more of a diamond shape after putting them together. What do I do wrong?

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  3. I want Tito ser this explication un vídeo, es to mucho better, thanksyou.

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  4. I’m going to try this today! I was working on a small round rug last night and it was getting wavy even though I was following the pattern. One question though, when you say, for example, R6: 3SC, (increase, 4SC) x 5, 1SC, does that mean 1SC in 3st or 3SC in 1st?

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    • Hey Danielle, sorry for the delay; I’m on hols right now. I mean 1 sc in each stitch for 3 stitches, then increase, then 4 sc in the next 4 stitches and repeat from the increase 5 times, then sc in the last stitch if the round. Does that make sense?

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  5. This is really perfect! Do you have a pattern for making a square background? For instance I want to make an afghan that has bold colored circles within a square. I love your stuff!

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  6. Hi, I want to ask whether the connection circles after the completion of the series

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  7. Hello. I am loving the circle pattern. I am trying to make a fairly large circle for a circular afghan I am experimenting with and want to get a better understanding of how to increase beyond the 10th round you’ve provided. You explained that the point is to stagger the increases to avoid forming the undesired corners. The increase formula, in and of itself, is basically the same with fewer occurring each round; and the odd numbered rounds (after round 2) each begins with a straight increase. However, I am trying to determine how you came up with the formula for the even numbered rounds which begin with individual single crochets. Are you selecting a random small number of individual stitches to begin with and then beginning the increase pattern you noted in parentheses and closing with whatever stitches remain? For example in round 6, you start with 4 single crochets and end with 2 single crochets having incorporated the increase pattern in between. How did you come up with the numbers 4 and 2? You did something similar in rounds 4, 6, and 10. I think knowing how you came up with those opening and closing numbers will help me properly continue with the larger circle I desire. After playing around on paper, this is a sample of what I came up with to potentially create rounds 11-14; I’d like to have your opinion on whether or not you think it may work, as I am really unsure:

    11: (Increase, 9sc) X 6 = 66
    12: (10sc, Increase) X 6 = 72
    13: (Increase, 11 sc) X 6 = 78
    14: 5sc (Inc., 12sc) X 6 = 84

    Thanks so much for the pattern and the assistance!

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    • Hi Sonia, basically you just need to make sure that you off-set the increases, so that the increase in one row is halfway between the increase in the previous row. As you’re planning to get larger and larger, I’d recommend even adding a third, so you would off-set it in a three row cycle. Because the larger your circle gets, the more you need to off-set to prevent straight edges from appearing. But if you’re only going up to 14 rows, what you’re thinking should be no problem at all!

      Here’s what I think (without spending much time, sorry!):

      5SC (inc, 8SC) x5, 3SC = 60
      (inc, 9SC) x 6 = 66
      6SC (inc, 10SC) x5, 4SC = 72
      (inc, 11SC) x 6 = 78
      7SC (inc, 12SC) x5, 5SC = 84.

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  8. MissNeriss…thanks! I have another quick question….did you chain up each round or simply begin the single crochets? I can’t find a seam in your circle.

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  9. Hi!

    I’m not understanding the math or i’m just not used to read the instructions this way or i’m not understanding the method. Can you help me what i’m missing?
    In your 4th Rnd:
    R4: 1SC, (increase, 2SC) x 5, SC = 24 stitches
    I only calculate 22sc? I found that in the other rounds too so very confused and would love to understand since this looks like a great method! 🙂

    Thanks!

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    • Hi Sarah, sorry for not getting back to you sooner, I think there’s a mistake! I think it should read 1SC, (inc, 2sc) x5, inc, sc = 24. Does that make sense? Sorry about that!

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  10. seetha krishnaswamy

    I am sorry if am wrong please correct me.. In your 4th round, it must be 1SC, inc, (inc, 2sc) x5, sc = 24.

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  11. How is each round being joined? I am still seeing a noticeable seam where the slip stitches are made.

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    • Hi Sonia, No join, no slip stitches. The circle is crocheted in the round, using stitch markers to keep count of the beginning and end of the row.

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      • MissNeriss, thanks! I didn’t realize that it was being worked like a spiral instead of a closed round. I was closing each round by slip stitching in the first stitch of the round when I should have simply gone into the next round by working a single crochet in the first stitch of the last round. Back to the drawing board!

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  12. Pingback: Crochet Time it’s Fall

  13. wow i want to thank you for clear explaining

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  14. Hello,

    Can you help me! In round 6, I’m getting only 34 stitches. Am I doing crocheting incorrectly?

    I crochet as followed:

    1sc in next 3 st
    Inc, 4 sc in next 4 st – repeating this step 5 times
    1sc

    And I’m repeatedly getting 34 stitches.

    PLEASE HELP!!

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    • Hi Kim, I’m really not sure what’s going on to be honest. I’m in holiday right now, so don’t have much internet to check it out. Can I let you have a look at the end of the week and let you know?

      Regards, Nerissa

      >

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      • Hello Missneriss,

        Hope you have a wonderful holiday. Thanks for your reply. I’m in no hurry so whenever you get the chance. Family 1st!! :0D Again, thank you!

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  15. Hello Missneriss,

    Sorry to keeping asking you so many question.
    On Round 8, I’m getting only 46 st
    On Round 10, I’m getting only 58 st

    What should I do to get it to the correct st count?

    Thanks!
    Kim

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    • ches R5: (ayse

      I was having same problem Kim.
      O thin the pattern should be corrected as below.
      I auditioned some “increase” written in capital letters.
      NOW IT WORKS

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    • I was having same problem Kim.
      O thin the pattern should be corrected as below.
      I auditioned some “increase” written in capital letters.
      NOW IT WORKS
      Increase, 3SC) x 6 = 30 stitches R6: 3SC, (increase, 4SC) x 5, INC

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    • R1: 6SC stitches into a Magic Ring
      R2: SC Increase around =12 stitches
      R3: (Increase, 1SC) x 6 = 18 stitches
      R4: 1SC, (increase, 2SC) x 5, Increase, SC = 24 stitches
      R5: (Increase, 3SC) x 6 = 30 stitches
      R6: 3SC, (increase, 4SC) x 5, INCREASE, 1SC = 36 stitches
      R7: (Increase, 5SC) x 6 = 42 stitches
      R8: 4SC, (increase, 6SC) x 5, INCREASE, 2SC = 48 stitches
      R9: (Increase, 7SC) x 6 = 54 stitches
      R10: 5SC, (increase, 8SC) x 5, INCREASE, 3SC = 60 stitches

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  16. I want to make the puffy baby owls but not sure of instructions. They seem simple but when I do them it don’t seem right. Is this a British pattern? I am in the States and I know instructions are different.do I inc more than once in each row? I crochet tight (not meaning to) s ok I was thinking of using a larger hook . Please help me if you can understand what I am asking. LOL

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    • Hi Teress,

      These instructions are using US terms, so you are probably doing the right thing. How about you send me an email (there’s a contact page on the menu bar on the site) and we can chat about it further?

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      • Teresa Alford

        I would love to chat about this! I want to make these little critters and need to understand the instructions. Can you give me the link so I can email you? Thank you!

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  17. cn you send me simple directions, I am 77 years old and need simple step by step directions I can understand

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    • Hi Patsy, this is as simple as I can make it, I’m afraid. The steps are a bit convoluted, but if you ensure you start a round with an increase, then the next round should have each increase half way between the increases from the previous round you should be fine. Does that help?

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  18. Hi all… I try to make this easier to remember by thinking of it like this:
    Let X = 1 sc in a stitch
    Let O = 2 sc in a stitch – in other words, an increase.
    Here we go… (Starting @ round 3)

    Round 3 – O X O X O X… Continue this all around until you get to 18 total stitches.
    Round 4 – O XX O XX O XX… Until = 24.
    Round 5 – O XXX O XXX O XXX… Until = 30.
    Round 6 – O XXXX O XXXX O XXXX… Until = 36.
    See the pattern?

    One more hint: if you’re planning to eventually ‘square off’ your circle… It is best to make sure that the total # of stitches in your round is divisible by 4.

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  19. Omg!!! Thank you! Ive tried many different thibf s and this is the only one that has worked!

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